By Rex Hammock, CEO

According to the internet, much of the way we live and work will never be the same because of the coronavirus. Here’s what I mean:

 

By Rex Hammock, CEO

Last week, I read a statement from the Think With Google team challenging marketers to use this moment in time to start a movement.

 

By Rex Hammock, CEO

One day, when we are looking back at how the coronavirus pandemic changed marketing, high on the list will be digital video—the streaming kind, the ubiquitous kind, the on-demand kind, the face-to-face kind, the always-recording kind.

Though digital video has been around for three decades, it has still been a mystery to marketers in many ways. But we’ve finally discovered that video isn’t one thing, it’s everything.

 

By Rex Hammock, CEO

Today is May 21, 2020, and, in my opinion, it’s an amazing day.

Today marks 70 days since the 2020 SEC Men’s Basketball Tournament was canceled because of COVID-19. The next day, President Trump declared a national emergency and life as we knew it changed.

Rarely, if ever, does a global event touch all our lives so intimately, threatening our public and personal lives simultaneously but in equally unique and distinct ways.

By Rex Hammock, CEO

Two months ago.

During the night and early morning of March 2-3, tornadoes ripped through Middle Tennessee, killing 25 people and injuring more than 300. More than 70,000 homes lost power in the storm.

Two days later, on March 5, the first case of COVID-19 was confirmed in Tennessee. A week later, on March 12, the NHL suspended its season indefinitely, and then permanently. The SEC men’s basketball tournament, scheduled to take place in Nashville, also was canceled. On March 13, President Trump declared a national emergency. As the number of confirmed cases of COVID-19 started to climb, businesses started to close.

By Rex Hammock, CEO

“What is the most powerful form of marketing?”

It’s these three simple words: “Help, not hype.”

We’ve written about it before, but it never fails to amaze us. When disaster strikes, people want to help in any way they can.

Idea Email: Recovery
Posted in Idea Email, by Rex Hammock
April 10, 2020

recovery

By Rex Hammock, CEO

Last week, the Hammock Healthcare Idea Email included insights from an article in the Harvard Business Review based on early data from China and how companies there are successfully moving through the pandemic. It is both insightful as a business story and as a study of how critical communication and content is in the “five stages” of pivoting to recovery.

By Rex Hammock, CEO

Many years ago, Hammock Inc. published a corporate magazine for a fast-growing company with more than 30,000 employees. Because much of the company’s growth came from acquisitions, it was a challenge for employees to keep up with all the things the corporation was becoming.

Inspired by National Geographic‘s issue-long photo feature, “A Day in the Life of America,” we suggested creating a corporate version. We told the company’s story through hundreds of photographs in locations across the country—all taken on the same day.

By Rex Hammock, CEO

Look at the screen you are using to read these words. Never before has such technology, ingenuity and creativity made it possible to spread your message to more people.

But, in reality, the most powerful forms of communication are not powered by technology—they are powered by the stories told through technology. Marketplaces are powered by two people looking at one another, face to face. Marketplaces are created when those two people grow into communities, conferences and forums.

By Rex Hammock, CEO

One of the content gifts the internet gave us is podcasting. Before podcasts came along, the ability to push audio messages to a global audience was limited to various types of radio signals requiring licenses and expensive equipment to operate. We’re talking everything from ham radio to CB to pirate radio to the old soup-can and string. In other words, podcasting was radio for the rest of us.