By John Lavey | Hammock President and COO

The economic disruption that has accompanied the COVID-19 pandemic reminds me of the Great Recession (2007–2009). We endured that experience and came through wiser for it. But we also know, with the benefit of hindsight, that a confluence of content marketing forces happened in those years that shaped the way we work today.

Are there patterns for healthcare content marketers taking shape right now that we can start to see? 

By John Lavey | Hammock President and COO

Mapping Experiences,written by Jim Kalbach, is a classic for marketing professionals who want to map customer experiences and design stronger ones.

The book has a wealth of practical ideas, and this one in particular has stuck with me: “When we map customer experiences, we are effectively mapping jobs to be done.” And there are three dimensions to checkoff within each job:

By John Lavey | Hammock President and COO

Throughout the COVID-19 pandemic, we have been helping clients maximize their investments in marketing. Many of our clients are used to holding annual conferences in exciting locations and using those times to engage prospects and customers with meaningful discussions. When the coronavirus spread through the nation, many companies faced real questions about how to replace that conference experience.

Spoiler alert: You can’t replace the benefit of face-to-face interactions and the energy those events provide.

By John Lavey | Hammock President and COO

If your company slowed or stopped sharing content with clients since the pandemic started, have you begun to reemerge? Or are you struggling to figure out what conversations to have with your clients right now?

If so, you aren’t alone.

By John Lavey | Hammock President and COO

Building a patient-centered healthcare system means creating highly satisfactory experiences in addition to healthy outcomes.

So what is satisfying to patients and their families? From the first moment someone in your market encounters your facility’s content and messaging—that first episode of care—nothing is more satisfying than displays of empathy. We all appreciate when a healthcare provider “gets it” and exhibits caring above and beyond what is required.

By: John Lavey | Hammock President/COO

At Hammock, we take our work seriously. We also are serious about our hammocks. A high-quality hammock is our going-away gift for our colleagues whom we have worked with for a long time.

While our company is named for our founder and CEO, Rex Hammock, we have long had an affinity for the symbol of relaxation, and the eagle-eyed among you may have noticed the suggestion of a hammock in our logo.

telehealth

By: John Lavey | Hammock President/COO

One development that has emerged from the pandemic has been the shift from in-person care to virtual care, including telehealth appointments via voice, chat or video. This change was rapid, and telehealth usage is expected to increase. But has marketing around this development kept pace?

By: John Lavey | Hammock President/COO

Baseball is back. This week, Major League Baseball announced a shortened 60-game season. Players report for training next week.

So what, if anything, does baseball have to do with healthcare?

 

By: John Lavey | Hammock President/COO

One of the most radical changes to the healthcare system that have transpired since the COVID-19 pandemic began, and will surely continue, has been the rapid shift to virtual health.

Prior to COVID-19, virtual care and telemedicine weren’t widely used. According to the American Medical Association, only 28% of doctors reported using telemedicine in 2019. A consumer study conducted in November 2019 found that only 12% of U.S. adults had ever used a telemedicine app, and about 14% of U.S. adults reported that they had never heard of telemedicine apps or websites. Despite that, about two-thirds reported that they were comfortable with the idea of virtual care, saying that convenience and costs were major factors in doing so.

 

By: John Lavey | Hammock President/COO

Green shoots, or new sales activities for many healthcare companies, are appearing on the ground over the last 60 days (since the start of the pandemic) without much new growth.

But traditional sales activities may not resume anytime soon. Lunches, seminars, conferences, boardroom presentations and travel will eventually happen again, but many groups are starting to think about what a new normal (or the next normal, as a friend shared with me this weekend) looks like.