By John Lavey | Hammock President/COO

Few organizations are as trusted as KLAS Research for its evaluations and ratings of the software, medical devices and services firms serving the healthcare industry.

A “Best in KLAS” distinction is the “Good Housekeeping Seal of Approval” for the industry, and a company that meets KLAS benchmarks can receive some of the best kind of marketing available. A great KLAS score can help a small company, in particular, get on the radar of large prospective customers.

By Rex Hammock

At Hammock, we believe marketing with content adds value to your product or service all along the customer journey. (We’ve even published a short Ebook on the topic.)

Yet too often I speak with marketers who pigeonhole content’s role somewhere at the very earliest steps of the journey. I agree early-stage marketing content is a powerful tool for lead generation, thought leadership, search engine optimization or sales efforts—all obviously vital to a company’s success.

But what about content for the rest of the journey?

By John Lavey | Hammock President/COO

Marketers focused on reaching hospitals have a different lead generation challenge than marketers in other industries. In a consumer environment, or in larger business-to-business markets, you are fishing in an ocean with millions of targets.

By Rex Hammock

I love how the web offers marketers the ability to communicate directly with their customers. It’s the same reason I love custom magazines, live events and email newsletters. These types of marketing have one thing in common—one thing that makes them different from traditional advertising and public relations. It’s the phrase, “directly with their customers.”

By Steve Sullivan, National Sales Director

I’m hearing more and more buzz about ABM (Account Based Marketing) as a “new” idea in marketing. For those of you scratching your head, we can boil it down fairly simply—it is an approach that targets large prospects by targeting each buyer or person with influence.

By Rex Hammock

After the recent announcement of the acquisition of Time Inc. by the media company Meredith, I received the usual round of questions whenever there’s some big news about magazines: Do magazines still work?

By John Lavey | Hammock President and COO

I’d like to think I’m a healthy person. But as I knock out my second handful of Trader Joe’s Cocoa Hazelnut Cookies while writing this piece, I’m reminded that healthy eating is more of a big idea than a reality, at least for me. (I’m willing to exercise regularly, but exercise accounts for a depressingly low amount of daily caloric burn.)

By Rex Hammock

Over the holidays, I did a lot of reading about the 16th century and its most famous denizens. As I became enthralled by the Renaissance, I was inspired once again to encourage those of us who use different types of media to market products or services to stop labeling ourselves as content marketers, search marketers, email marketers or digital marketers. Instead, we should view ourselves as people who use content, email, print, video, etc., to create new opportunities and solve long-standing challenges.

By John Lavey | Hammock President and COO

While wrapping up several year-end customer media and marketing content projects, I remembered the story at the opening of David Foster Wallace’s commencement speech, “This Is Water,” at Kenyon College in 2005.

The story tells the tale of two young fish who meet an older fish as they are swimming. The older fish nods at the younger ones and says, “Morning, boys, how’s the water?” The two young fish continue swimming, until one looks at the other and says, “What the hell is water?”

By Rex Hammock

The ideas and practices that encompass what is today called content marketing have been used since the advent of mass media and the industrial revolution. However, the development of digital media has spurred the marketing and communication industry to reboot the labels, definitions and roles of content tools and strategies.