telehealth

By: John Lavey | Hammock President/COO

One development that has emerged from the pandemic has been the shift from in-person care to virtual care, including telehealth appointments via voice, chat or video. This change was rapid, and telehealth usage is expected to increase. But has marketing around this development kept pace?

 

By Rex Hammock, CEO

According to the internet, much of the way we live and work will never be the same because of the coronavirus. Here’s what I mean:

By: John Lavey | Hammock President/COO

Baseball is back. This week, Major League Baseball announced a shortened 60-game season. Players report for training next week.

So what, if anything, does baseball have to do with healthcare?

 

By Rex Hammock, CEO

Last week, I read a statement from the Think With Google team challenging marketers to use this moment in time to start a movement.

 

By: John Lavey | Hammock President/COO

One of the most radical changes to the healthcare system that have transpired since the COVID-19 pandemic began, and will surely continue, has been the rapid shift to virtual health.

Prior to COVID-19, virtual care and telemedicine weren’t widely used. According to the American Medical Association, only 28% of doctors reported using telemedicine in 2019. A consumer study conducted in November 2019 found that only 12% of U.S. adults had ever used a telemedicine app, and about 14% of U.S. adults reported that they had never heard of telemedicine apps or websites. Despite that, about two-thirds reported that they were comfortable with the idea of virtual care, saying that convenience and costs were major factors in doing so.

 

By Rex Hammock, CEO

One day, when we are looking back at how the coronavirus pandemic changed marketing, high on the list will be digital video—the streaming kind, the ubiquitous kind, the on-demand kind, the face-to-face kind, the always-recording kind.

Though digital video has been around for three decades, it has still been a mystery to marketers in many ways. But we’ve finally discovered that video isn’t one thing, it’s everything.

 

By: John Lavey | Hammock President/COO

Green shoots, or new sales activities for many healthcare companies, are appearing on the ground over the last 60 days (since the start of the pandemic) without much new growth.

But traditional sales activities may not resume anytime soon. Lunches, seminars, conferences, boardroom presentations and travel will eventually happen again, but many groups are starting to think about what a new normal (or the next normal, as a friend shared with me this weekend) looks like.

 

By Rex Hammock, CEO

Today is May 21, 2020, and, in my opinion, it’s an amazing day.

Today marks 70 days since the 2020 SEC Men’s Basketball Tournament was canceled because of COVID-19. The next day, President Trump declared a national emergency and life as we knew it changed.

Rarely, if ever, does a global event touch all our lives so intimately, threatening our public and personal lives simultaneously but in equally unique and distinct ways.

 

By: John Lavey | Hammock President/COO

One of the big issues in healthcare “getting back to a new normal” is the resumption of elective procedures. On March 19, the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services (CMS) issued a recommendation to postpone most elective procedures. In effect, the spigot for a hospital’s revenue has been turned off for two months.

From an economic point of view, elective procedures are the lifeblood of a healthcare system’s revenue stream and profitability, and the loss of elective procedures is gashing hospitals’ margins.

By Rex Hammock, CEO

Two months ago.

During the night and early morning of March 2-3, tornadoes ripped through Middle Tennessee, killing 25 people and injuring more than 300. More than 70,000 homes lost power in the storm.

Two days later, on March 5, the first case of COVID-19 was confirmed in Tennessee. A week later, on March 12, the NHL suspended its season indefinitely, and then permanently. The SEC men’s basketball tournament, scheduled to take place in Nashville, also was canceled. On March 13, President Trump declared a national emergency. As the number of confirmed cases of COVID-19 started to climb, businesses started to close.