By Chris Edwards

We’ve all heard about the importance of nonverbal communication, with some experts claiming that as much as 93% of communication is nonverbal in nature.

This idea of merging nonverbal communication with an excellent experience became real for me more than 20 years ago when I was selling shoes at Nordstrom to pay for college. The job required sharp attention to detail: thinking through how to approach a customer, thoughtfully suggesting shoes for them, and following through on their needs and wants. The experience went well beyond talking about a shoe—every interaction with the customer sent a message, positive or negative, to them.

By Rex Hammock, CEO

Customers don’t just purchase products and services—they purchase solutions and outcomes. Offering your marketplace the shiniest new object is no longer enough. You must provide the best product, as well as a platform that supports it with the best service and explanatory content and media.

But that’s not all. Once a customer owns your product, they’ll want more knowledge and insight into how that product can best serve them. They’ll also expect ongoing training, certification and continuing education.

By Rex Hammock, CEO

We all know the Norman Rockwell painting above. It’s Thanksgiving Day dinner, and the family’s matriarch is presenting a bountiful feast to several generations of her family. The image has become a powerful graphic embodiment of the gratitude the American holiday symbolizes.

While the artistic merits of the painting have been debated since it was created in 1943, it’s impossible to challenge the impact and power of the illustration and the three other paintings in a series known as “The Four Freedoms.”

By: John Lavey | Hammock President/COO

We regularly talk about the high value of case studies or testimonials when marketing to healthcare providers or payers. I am one of those people who can learn a lot from a case study if it’s relevant to me.

But assuming that everyone in your audience can see themselves in another similar company doesn’t take into account all learning styles.

By Rex Hammock, CEO

In 1957, unemployed magazine editor Vance Packard spent two months writing a book about advertising titled The Hidden Persuaders. He was not an expert in advertising, and much of the content of the book came from interviews and the writings of others.

The book is primarily remembered today for its mention of a concept that would come to be known as subliminal advertising. This technique was supposed to increase sales during movies by flashing messages like “Eat popcorn” and “Drink Coca-Cola” on the screen at a speed so fast they couldn’t consciously be seen. Advertising experts dismissed the book and the concept of subliminal advertising—but the public loved it and bought 3 million copies.

By Rex Hammock, CEO

Earlier this week, the Wall Street Journal explored the current state of internet influencers. Spoiler alert: The article isn’t gung-ho about the “influencer economy” in which they say, “billions are being paid to social media personalities to pitch products riddled with deceit.” However, the article accepts the reality that, at least for the near future, influence marketing is going to be a part of the digital and social media marketing pallet.

By: John Lavey | Hammock President/COO

Countless healthcare events are held every year, from high-level thought leadership seminars to more intimate symposiums. But when it comes to organizing these conferences, marketers often have the same complaint: The amazing content created for the event—typically one of the organization’s largest investments—usually doesn’t outlive the conference itself.

By Rex Hammock, CEO

Since the earliest days of using the term “content marketing,” there has been confusion and debate over what the phrase means. In an article for the Content Marketing Institute, author Michael Brenner explains that one reason for the confusion is that “using content for marketing” and “creating content” mean different things.

 

“Us Tareyton smokers would rather fight than switch” was a classic advertising slogan of the Don Draper era. Featuring a smiling model with a black eye, the grammatically incorrect Tareyton print ads ran from 1963 until the early 1980s. (Cigarette advertising on TV ended in 1971.) On its surface, the slogan was a clever way to encourage loyalty to the Tareyton brand. Yet beneath the surface, it was an insidious and not-so-subtle rallying cry for smokers to ignore the evidence linking smoking to cancer that started mounting in earnest with the 1964 Surgeon General’s report.

In the 55 years since the report was issued, the percentage of Americans who smoke has fallen from 42% in 1964 to 14% today. But nearly 34 million Americans still smoke, apparently willing to fight to the death than switch.

By Rex Hammock, CEO

If you google “the lost art of storytelling,” you’ll find link after link of people longing for a bygone time when there were great storytellers. “We’ve lost the ability to tell stories well,” they lament. We lost it in a time and place called the good ol’ days, they mourn.

In reality, we are living in a golden age of storytelling. Never have there been more stories, more ways to tell stories, more outlets for sharing stories or more fans of storytelling.