By Rex Hammock

Yesterday, the social media dashboard Hootsuite issued a report predicting 2019’s most important social media trends for brands and businesses. It bases its predictions on a survey of large and small social media departments and agencies.

It’s worth a read, but here are its five trends boiled down to one sentence each.

All parts of the marketing mix have their strengths: Data informs. Advertising connects. Content—done well—activates your audience. Engaging customers can be a worthy goal for content marketing. When it comes to lead generation content, though, you want to create action. Those actions are more likely to occur when you take a sound process and approach to content, instead of merely tossing out content into the wide blue web.

By Rex Hammock

On the Tuesday before each Thanksgiving,
we share this idea. And with it, we send our deepest thanks.

Not long ago, the most powerful word in marketing was the word FREE.
That era ended with the creation of filters that automatically translate that word into spam.

Now, we believe the most powerful word in marketing is THANKS.

There’s one thing all midterm election voters can agree on: We’re glad it’s over. But whenever there’s a massive investment in marketing and advertising a product (or, in this case, a candidate), those of us who are healthcare marketers need to pause and ask, “Is there a lesson we can learn here?”

Forbes Magazine recently recognized Hammock’s founder, Rex Hammock, as a leading voice in the field of content marketing. In an article published in late October, Rex described how Hammock uses content to build brand loyalty and tell stories to create long-term relationships with customers.

Rex discusses the challenges of defining content marketing, explains the best way to use content and pulls no punches in calling out good and bad uses of content marketing. The industry pioneer also shares the most effective customer-marketing components that have been the secret to Hammock’s success over the past 27 years.

To read more of Rex’s expert observations on content marketing, find the full article here.

By Rex Hammock

Perhaps you’ve heard the big news of the week. No, not the midterm elections. I’m referring to Amazon sending out a 70-page catalog promoting Christmas toys this year. A real catalog. The kind printed on paper pages, not displayed on web pages. The kind of catalog I used to look forward to every year about this time.

By: John Lavey | Hammock President/COO

At Hammock, we are fortunate to be in a field at the crossroads of two technologies that impact the way we live and work:

By Rex Hammock

The first time I wrote about podcasting was 14 years ago, on September 29, 2005, on RexBlog.com. The day before, a Google search for the word “podcasts” turned up only 24 results. “I can see magazines, associations, churches, schools and companies utilizing podcasting to distribute regular audio content to their audiences,” I wrote. In other words, I was enthusiastic about the future of podcasting. And, despite a constant stream of predictions from “experts” that “podcasting is dead” (not to be confused with podcasts about death), I still believe the golden age of customer-focused podcasting is before us.

By: John Lavey | Hammock President/COO

I started working in media in the early 1990s. In those days, the content we created was driven to someone’s house in the early morning and tossed on the driveway. Today, the content we create can be consumed by someone on her mobile device as she flies to Europe.

By Rex Hammock

On October 8, Alphabet, the parent company of Google, announced it was pulling the plug on Google+. It was at least the company’s fourth attempt at creating a social network that would compete with Facebook.

When Google+ launched in 2011, it was a big deal backed by nearly a billion dollars and all the great minds they could round up.