By Rex Hammock

Content marketing can often seem like new labels applied to old ideas. In a broad way, it can even mean Broadway. At least, that’s what you may think after watching the Netflix documentary ”Bathtubs Over Broadway.”

Steve Young, a former writer for the “Late Show with David Letterman,” was the subject of the documentary directed by Dava Whisenant and co-written by Dava and Ozzy Inguanzo. The documentary is both funny and fascinating in its exploration of the heyday of industrial musicals.

By Rex Hammock

Last year I wrote, “Despite a constant stream of predictions from experts that ‘podcasting is dead,’ I still believe the golden age of customer-focused podcasting is ahead of us.”

Since the earliest moments of podcasting, I have been a true believer in its long-range potential as a cornerstone of any content marketing strategy. But until recently, I’ve been cautious about advising clients to make the medium the central focus of their content market strategy.

By Rex Hammock

For the past several years, Hammock has produced multiple digital media campaigns in various forms and formats, all with different marketing goals and purposes.

Early in the digital content era, many of these efforts were aimed at some type of lead generation or thought leadership. Today, marketers have discovered that content can—and should—play a central role in any ongoing marketing and communications program, from supporting a public policy effort to launching a new product to providing a constant flow of sales support in the form of video, social media and presentation materials.

By Rex Hammock

This past weekend, 600,000 people visited Nashville to experience the NFL Draft live. In addition to all those cowboy boots on the ground, some 49 million NFL fans viewed the event via seven cable networks and an array of Disney digital properties.

If you’re not an NFL fan, pause now and let this next sentence sink in: There was no actual football game being played at this event—other than the game in which 32 billionaire owners select 254 players who hope to be millionaires soon.

By Rex Hammock

In the past, there were only a few paid media metrics that revealed the effectiveness of advertising. Two of the classics were “reach” and “frequency.” Reach was the potential audience size reached by an advertising campaign and frequency was the potential number of times a customer would come in contact with the ad.

Is this a hardware store? An art gallery? An upscale restaurant? Yes.

By Rex Hammock

Never has there been so many options for developing deep and lasting relationships with great numbers of customers. Today, the options for how to serve those customers are, literally, everywhere.

By Rex Hammock

Next Monday, March 25, Apple is expected to release a wide array of media services. While the anticipated announcements sound similar to already-existing products (AppleTV, Hulu, Amazon Prime, etc.), Apple will likely have approaches and features that will make us rethink how we interact with such services. In other words, don’t just look for a predictable take on streaming video.

By Rex Hammock

Technology journalist Doc Searls has a simple way of explaining how media with the same format—the magazine format, for example—can be very different. The key to understanding the difference, he says, is by understanding the business model of various magazines.

By Rex Hammock

Several years ago on my personal blog, I poked fun at an essay written by a celebrity CEO. On her Tumblr page, she had shared a weekend experience during which she redesigned the company’s logo with a team of employees. (My favorite line of her post was, “Our last move was to tilt the exclamation point by 9 degrees, just to add a bit of whimsy.”)

Graphic and corporate design are critical to content marketing. But such an exercise, as described in the essay, is an example of taking a good thing too far.

By Rex Hammock

Nearly 30 years ago, when Hammock first started helping clients develop recurring media programs for association members, customers or enthusiasts, the term “service journalism” was used more than it is today. Typically, the phrase refers to a type of magazine or website that focuses on the how-tos of a topic or passion. For example, Better Homes and Gardens is a quintessential service magazine for several generations of readers.