By Rex Hammock

In the past, there were only a few paid media metrics that revealed the effectiveness of advertising. Two of the classics were “reach” and “frequency.” Reach was the potential audience size reached by an advertising campaign and frequency was the potential number of times a customer would come in contact with the ad.

Is this a hardware store? An art gallery? An upscale restaurant? Yes.

By Rex Hammock

Never has there been so many options for developing deep and lasting relationships with great numbers of customers. Today, the options for how to serve those customers are, literally, everywhere.

By Rex Hammock

Next Monday, March 25, Apple is expected to release a wide array of media services. While the anticipated announcements sound similar to already-existing products (AppleTV, Hulu, Amazon Prime, etc.), Apple will likely have approaches and features that will make us rethink how we interact with such services. In other words, don’t just look for a predictable take on streaming video.

By Rex Hammock

Technology journalist Doc Searls has a simple way of explaining how media with the same format—the magazine format, for example—can be very different. The key to understanding the difference, he says, is by understanding the business model of various magazines.

By Rex Hammock

Several years ago on my personal blog, I poked fun at an essay written by a celebrity CEO. On her Tumblr page, she had shared a weekend experience during which she redesigned the company’s logo with a team of employees. (My favorite line of her post was, “Our last move was to tilt the exclamation point by 9 degrees, just to add a bit of whimsy.”)

Graphic and corporate design are critical to content marketing. But such an exercise, as described in the essay, is an example of taking a good thing too far.

By Rex Hammock

Nearly 30 years ago, when Hammock first started helping clients develop recurring media programs for association members, customers or enthusiasts, the term “service journalism” was used more than it is today. Typically, the phrase refers to a type of magazine or website that focuses on the how-tos of a topic or passion. For example, Better Homes and Gardens is a quintessential service magazine for several generations of readers.

By Rex Hammock

At Hammock, we use the terms “chronological” and “contextual” to describe two types of information a company should provide as part of an effective content strategy. Here’s how we define those terms:

By Rex Hammock

During the past decade, people like me who live in Nashville have witnessed a fascinating phenomenon. While Nashville had been known for a couple of styles of food (scorching spicy chicken and comfort food served at meat-and-threes), the city was never considered a food mecca.

That has changed dramatically.

By Rex Hammock

This week marks our 150th Idea Email. (Here’s the complete archive.) Until now, we’ve never included New Year’s resolutions for people who market with content and customer media. Pick and choose from these 10 content marketing resolutions for 2019 as needed—or, if you’re feeling especially productive, tackle all 10.

Healthcare Technology Trends
How We Overestimate Tech’s Short-Term Impact and Underestimate Its Long-Term Impact

During the next few weeks, you’ll be seeing lots of articles listing the most important stories of 2018 and predictions for 2019 healthcare trends. Here’s our prediction: There will be very little difference between last year’s and this year’s predictions.


Why? Trends don’t happen in predictable blocks of time. Usually the things we think are speeding past us are actually moving quite slow. A technology trend can take decades—20 years, some experts say—to mature into something that’s viable, usable or real. (Has anyone yet to see a self-driving car on the street in your town?)