By Rex Hammock, CEO

Since the earliest days of using the term “content marketing,” there has been confusion and debate over what the phrase means. In an article for the Content Marketing Institute, author Michael Brenner explains that one reason for the confusion is that “using content for marketing” and “creating content” mean different things.

 

“Us Tareyton smokers would rather fight than switch” was a classic advertising slogan of the Don Draper era. Featuring a smiling model with a black eye, the grammatically incorrect Tareyton print ads ran from 1963 until the early 1980s. (Cigarette advertising on TV ended in 1971.) On its surface, the slogan was a clever way to encourage loyalty to the Tareyton brand. Yet beneath the surface, it was an insidious and not-so-subtle rallying cry for smokers to ignore the evidence linking smoking to cancer that started mounting in earnest with the 1964 Surgeon General’s report.

In the 55 years since the report was issued, the percentage of Americans who smoke has fallen from 42% in 1964 to 14% today. But nearly 34 million Americans still smoke, apparently willing to fight to the death than switch.

By Rex Hammock, CEO

If you google “the lost art of storytelling,” you’ll find link after link of people longing for a bygone time when there were great storytellers. “We’ve lost the ability to tell stories well,” they lament. We lost it in a time and place called the good ol’ days, they mourn.

In reality, we are living in a golden age of storytelling. Never have there been more stories, more ways to tell stories, more outlets for sharing stories or more fans of storytelling.

By: John Lavey | Hammock President/COO

A common complaint about websites is they don’t clearly and explicitly convey a company’s mission and goals. In fact, one of the worst things to hear about your own site is,  “I looked through it, but I still don’t know what you do.”

farmers insurance
By Rex Hammock, CEO

The term “campaign” is used in many ways, in various contexts.

A political campaign is the process candidates must successfully follow to be elected to a public office. A military campaign is a series of battles that are part of a larger war. An advertising campaign is a coordinated series of advertisements, typically using several media channels, that are tied together with a complementary style and personality. Each type of campaign reflects a recurring commitment, discipline and multi-pronged approach to success.

By: John Lavey | Hammock President/COO

Measuring the impact of marketing investments, including content, on a company’s bottom line is a struggle for marketers—at least for those who are being honest.

By Rex Hammock, CEO

Unlike most large corporations and industry associations that commission research to show how much their customers love their products, Google and other internet advertising networks have done something radical: They’ve used research to make the seemingly obvious assertion that “the online ad experience has sometimes fallen short of consumers’ expectations.” The result? Users react by adding ad-blocking extensions to their browsers.

By Steve Sullivan, National Sales Director

I spent an eternity last week with U-Haul trying to solve a simple moving problem. I may as well have been looking for the Coke recipe or Google’s current search algorithm.

We were looking for a certain sized trailer for a family member’s move to a new city. But searching for the trailer online, getting help from customer service, and then seeing the difference between what exists at the local U-Haul center and what appears online—each person we talked to seemed to have been speaking a different language. And this is not complicated stuff.

By Rex Hammock, CEO

Google Trends is a clever tool that tracks user interest in search terms. The trends can be measured in increments of time ranging from a few hours up to 15 years.

Google Trends can also serve as a reminder that technology and marketing buzzwords have life cycles of popularity similar to the fads and fashions in any industry.

By: John Lavey | Hammock President/COO

We’ve observed an interesting nuance in the language used in marketing materials for behavioral health specialists—they refer to their customers as clients, not patients.

It’s a subtle difference, but it implies that the individual being served is involved in ongoing care. The language has evolved to encompass continuing care, not just one-off transactions.